July 26th, 2017
siderea: (Default)
posted by [personal profile] siderea at 12:48am on 26/07/2017 under ,
I'm reading this really great journal article in the field of medical anthropology, and it got me thinking, "I wanna quote this whole thing. I bet my readers would really dig this." And then I thought, I wonder if I asked nicely if the author would let me republish it as a guest post in my journal? And then I thought, I wonder if the author even has the authority to do that, once their paper has been published in a journal?

What rights does the author of journal article have in their article once published in a journal? I appreciate this might vary by specific journal (or organization that owns or edits the journal), but are there general trends? Do journals typically require submitting authors forfeit the right to publish the work for free on the internet? Forever? What if an author wants to contribute the paper as a chapter in an anthology (book)? Or write their own book in which the paper is one chapter?
July 25th, 2017
kaberett: Overlaid Mars & Venus symbols, with Swiss Army knife tools at other positions around the central circle. (Default)
liv: cast iron sign showing etiolated couple drinking tea together (argument)
posted by [personal profile] liv at 05:25pm on 25/07/2017 under
I feel completely out of step with most of my friends politically. UK politics, very gloomy )
location: Keele University, Staffordshire, England
Mood:: 'despairing' despairing
Music:: Spin Doctors: Two princes
naath: (Default)
posted by [personal profile] naath at 01:05pm on 25/07/2017
17.A song that you would sing as a duet on karaoke

Oh. Um. Hard. I don't karaoke that often. I think my favourite Singstar track is this:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fJ9rUzIMcZQ

(Bohemian Rhapsody)
andrewducker: (Default)
lathany: (Default)
We watched Tale of Tales on Friday. It consisted of three separate fairy tales being told about three royal families. There was little overlap between them, but they were all in the same style. It was rather weird and the characters were all difficult to empathise with as all seemed very selfish and uncaring about others (or more than one other person). On the plus side it was at least very different from everything else I've seen recently.

Alistair finally ran a session of Glimmer Scuffles (Star Wars) on Sunday after a seven month break.
  • We finally caught up with the datacron that would clear our names,
  • saw the moment believed to be the creation of the Sith,
  • spoke with the thousand year Emperor,
  • discovered we all had force potential now, and
  • started preparing for a planetary war.

I tried another Glitter Tattoo on Thursday, this was a flock of birds.



It really wasn't very durable and lasted less than 24 hours. I don't yet know if it's because I put them on poorly, or if it's the small details that disappear quickest.
Mood:: 'sick' sick
July 24th, 2017
ilanin: (Default)
Day 25's prompt is "A song by an artist no longer living", which was always going to be a rock and roll piece because it's about the only major part of music that I really like I've not dropped in on yet. By "rock and roll" I am referring to the culuturally fusionist blending of boogie-woogie, country, and rhythm and blues which first appeared in the Southern US in the late 1940s and early 1950s, and not the wider genre of music that evolved from it in the 1960s and beyond. The problem is that while I wrote "fusionist" above I could equally well have written "appropriative"; quite a lot of early rock and roll represented the performance of black American music by white artists, sometimes to the extent of being the same pieces of music. Pat Boone pretty much made a career of covering Little Richard (to be fair to Boone, had he not done so, far fewer people would ever have heard of Little Richard or his music; it's a simple fact that music played by a White American could get wider distribution and airplay than that produced by a Black one). That's not to say there weren't "white" elements in rock and roll, because there were, but overall (like a lot of the 1950s) it's a somewhat problematic subgenre. The thing with this is, where do you stop? The music of the Beatles and similar groups which defined the early 1960s comes from a secondary fusion, that of the rock and roll of the late 1950s with the skiffle craze popular in England at the time, and from that starting point it's not particularly difficult to condemn the entire genre of rock music, which seems somewhat unreasonable.

All of which goes some way to explaining why it is I picked a Chuck Berry song out, despite weirdly feeling that Berry (who died in March of this year) is somehow 'less dead' than my original thought of Buddy Holly (who died in a plane crash in 1959...you've heard the song, right?)



The list )
liv: alternating calligraphed and modern letters (letters)
posted by [personal profile] liv at 03:31pm on 24/07/2017 under ,
A song that is a cover by another artist. I think this has to be Tori Amos' cover of I don't like Mondays, originally by the Boomtown Rats.

Tori Amos was I think the first musician I really got intensely into, beyond just enjoying the sound of somebody's music. The single Cornflake girl was on the radio a lot in the mid 90s, and I quite liked it but didn't have any context. Then I met MK when we were both up for Oxford interview, and became instant friends. He put a lot of effort into supporting me through a somewhat bumpy transition from sheltered child to independent person, including dealing with a bereavement that hit me really hard when I was 19. He's also responsible for introducing me to digital socializing (email, instant messenger, Usenet to an extent, and the wonderful world of peer-to-peer file sharing). And he played lots of Tori songs for me when I was sitting in the dark crying about letting go of childhood naive optimism. I bought Little earthquakes on CD, and had access to a lot of Tori's oeuvre for all of the 90s via not entirely licit digital copies. Not only Tori Amos, there was a lot of alt stuff especially goth that I picked up from [personal profile] doseybat, but Tori Amos was pretty much the soundtrack of inventing myself as an adult.

I don't like Mondays was almost a novelty thing in a way, recorded with a bunch of much less successful covers, of things like Smells like teen spirit which really doesn't work for Amos' musical style, most of which were never commercially released. This one did make it to Strange little girls, the concept album of gender-bent cover songs, which I was never fully convinced by. I haven't been strongly into Tori Amos' music since 2000, not that I think it's bad but it isn't part of my psyche in the way that the 90s material is. But anyway, it's a remix of a song written in response to a school shooting in the late 70s. The original is meant to be ironic, but it comes across as so inappropriately jolly that it often gets played on the radio as a joke song, here's one to cheer you up from your Monday commuting blues... Tori Amos' cover is a total reworking, without any irony at all, just sadness about a teenaged girl turning a gun on her schoolmates.

So it kind of epitomizes why Tori Amos meant a lot to me at that time in my life; she wrote and performed beautiful songs (she's a classically trained musician) about serious subjects which she took seriously. But that seriousness isn't about glorying in the violence and ugliness, it's about challenging it. video embed, audio only )

As a bonus, have kd lang's cover of Leonard Cohen's Hallelujah. It's a song that gets covered way too often, nearly always as a kind of soppy lovesong that really fails to do justice to the extremely powerful original. So basically I hate Hallelujah covers, except this one. Again, it's very different from Cohen's original, but it's an emotionally serious interpretation in its own right which doesn't cheapen its source material.
Mood:: 'contemplative' contemplative
location: Pumbedita House, Cambridge, England
naath: (Default)
posted by [personal profile] naath at 01:29pm on 24/07/2017
16.One of your favourite classical songs

To stretch 'classical' rather a lot...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GXFSK0ogeg4

oh fortuna, Orf
andrewducker: (Default)
ilanin: (Default)
posted by [personal profile] ilanin at 12:17am on 24/07/2017 under
Today's prompt is "A Song by a Band you wish were still together". This raises interesting questions about "by", namely whether it means "written by" or "performed by" (which is very important in the case of Bellowhead, who did not perform entirely original material), and also "together" (are the Stone Roses together? Cryptic comments by Ian Brown suggest not, but no actual annoucement. Are Katzenjammer together, if by that I mean the original quartet rather than the remaining trio?).

In the end I decided it was perfectly reasonable to go for a Bellowhead number, since many of their versions of old folk tunes are sufficiently reinterpreted to not bear that much resemblance to the traditional songs. Like many fans of folk music, I definitely wish Bellowhead were still together due to their high-energy music and the atmosphere of their live performances. The following is a good example of both of the previous sentences:




This is a mashup of the quasi-patriotic march "Lillibulero", from which the tune and the nonsense words are preserved (the words that originally went with the nonsense date from the late 17th century and satirise the motivations of Catholic forces loyal to James II), and "The Devil and the Farmer's Wife", from whence the rest of the words come. Sufficient research reveals that this combination wasn't entirely original to them, being released by Barry Dransfield on a 1994 album, but Dransfield's version would (I assume, not having been able to locate it, but this is what he does) have been scored for solo guitar and probably been rather more ballad-like than the above.

The list )
July 23rd, 2017
rmc28: Rachel smiling against background of trees, with newly-cut short hair (Default)
posted by [personal profile] rmc28 at 10:31pm on 23/07/2017 under
numbers )
andrewducker: (Default)
posted by [personal profile] andrewducker at 09:27pm on 23/07/2017
Five years ago I had a disagreement with a friend over whether this article was being overly pessimistic about augmented reality and whether we'd have "hard" AR soon.

Five years later, and this is the state of the art:


Which is, I totally admit, a very neat tech demo. But it's not "there" yet. The FOV is too small, and you can see the real world through it. Although, to be fair, most of the time the real world isn't _that_ distracting, you're definitely not going to be able to "see Victorian gas lamps in place of normal lights" or "have a real Coke can that you want to turn into an AR Pepsi can by drawing a Pepsi logo over the Coke logo".

Ah well, I'll make a note to come back in five years time and see where we are then!
rmc28: Rachel smiling against background of trees, with newly-cut short hair (Default)
Last Sunday (after Saturday's epic dog chase where I lost my keys) I woke up feeling the most hungover I have in years.  And I didn't even get drunk first!  I did manage to pull myself together by early afternoon, and we successfully hosted Nicholas's birthday party at the Little Gym in the late afternoon.

Yesterday was tiring, but for a much more pleasant reason. I took Nicholas to see My First Ballet: Cinderella at the Peacock Theatre, and for icecream at Ruby Violet afterward. We walked to Ruby Violet through pouring rain with bright new umbrellas, and had the whole shop to ourselves.  By the time we'd finished eating it was bright and sunny for the return walk to Kings Cross.  This morning I was thankfully free of hangover symptoms, but did (need to) spend the morning in bed again.  (Reading fanfic and re-reading All Systems Red; there are worse ways to spend a Sunday morning.)

The shiny new phone runs Pokemon Go and on Friday I let Charles talk me into installing it and going for a daily walk with him. The first evening, we passed the charity shop and saw the biggest Angry Bird toy I have ever seen.  Charles bought it at opening time the next morning.  Today our walk took us past the noticeboard in the park - where someone had hung my lost keys!  About five minutes later, we met one of the people who'd put them there, who said they'd found them about 5 minutes after I'd gone home last week from grumpily trawling the park!  I thanked them profusely and asked them to pass it on.

Nicholas says he wants to be called Nick rather than Nico, and I'm slipping up far too often, but at least making sure other adults taking care of him are made aware, and giving him some standard reminder phrases to use on me and others. (It's really not my preferred version of his name, but it's his name not mine, so I need to get over that.)

School has finished for the summer, and in less than two weeks we will be in Helsinki!  I have so much to do between now and then ...
emperor: (Default)
posted by [personal profile] emperor at 04:50pm on 23/07/2017 under
I didn't really have enough time to get through the Hugo reading this year, but I did manage to read enough of the shortlisted novels that I voted for them. I voted thus:

  1. A Closed and Common Orbit; I read The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet shortly before the shortlist was announced (and really enjoyed it), which perhaps biased me in favour of this one. That did mean that I knew how one of the story arcs was going to finish, but it was still an engaging read, and I thought the way the author approached neurodiversity was gently but well done
  2. Ninefox Gambit; I would not normally go for military SF, and it did take me a while to get into this, but the author has created a fascinating world, and I really want to find out how the series progresses. Despite being the first in a series, this had a decent narrative arc of its own
  3. All the Birds in the Sky; I wanted to like this, but didn't in the end. The chapters were a bit abrupt, it sometimes felt like it was just being clever, and the magic felt a bit deus ex machina in places. I also found the (inevitable?) romance plot pretty weak. Also, the ending was a bit disappointing.
  4. Too Like the Lightning; I didn't like this at all. The narrator was infuriating, the style affected, the continued harping on about gender irksome, and it didn't even try to come to a natural close, it just stopped. I know there's a sequel, but really.


I didn't read Death's End, because I hated 3-Body Problem; I didn't read The Obelisk Gate because I didn't manage to get hold of a copy (the kindle voter packet only had an excerpt).
andrewducker: (Default)
siderea: (Default)
posted by [personal profile] siderea at 01:34am on 23/07/2017 under
Every. single. time. my shell hosting company announces a planned outage for an upgrade for something having to do with email, and they assure me that it won't impact me at all and I won't have any email outage, every single time they've wrong.

I'm not going to embarrass them in public because they do try so hard and are quick to fix broken things when I bring them to their attention.

It's just that, by now, I'd hope they'd just email me, "Hey, Siderea, we'll be fucking up your email at this future date and time. We'll be around on Twitter until this subsequent date and time. Please be available during this window to exercise your account and let us know what we've broken this time."

Instead, I email them in response to the planned outage announcement and say, "Hey, what can we do in advance to make this work?" and they're like "nothing, it's all going to go perfectly!" and I'm like, "ooookay, when exactly will you be flipping the switch, (so I know when to check on you, but I don't say this part)?" and they're like, "oh, sometime on that weekend." *throws hands in the air*

(I miss nyip.net so hard.)
July 22nd, 2017
wildeabandon: photo of me with wavy hair and gold lipstick (Default)
posted by [personal profile] wildeabandon at 10:58pm on 22/07/2017
We had an early start, but not horrifically so. It was my first time travelling on the Eurostar, and it was lovely, with comfy seats and tasty food, but even more pleasant was the Thalys train from Brussels to Amsterdam. On arrival at the station we picked up an iamsterdam card which gets us travel and free/reduced entry into lots of museums and such, then took the tram to our hotel. The room is perhaps a little on the small side, but pleasant, and the bed is comfortable, which is the important thing.

We deliberately didn’t plan anything but unpacking and decompressing for this afternoon, which was the right call, as after all that travelling we were both feeling rather in need of a nap. We woke up around dinner time, and then went out for sushi (possibly an odd choice, but our first meal on our first holiday together in Prague was also sushi, so it seemed auspicious). It certainly wasn’t a bad choice - the sashimi was beautifully presented and very fresh, and the rice texture was spot on. My high point was either the scallop sashimi with tobiko, or the raw beef, avocado and cucumber roll, which was subtle and gorgeous.

After dinner [personal profile] obandsoller was feeling quite tired, so we came back to the hotel, and although my intention was to drop him off and then go for a stroll around the nearby Oosterpark, I ended up getting eaten by the inertia monster until it got dark, so that will have to wait until tomorrow.
wildeabandon: photo of me with wavy hair and gold lipstick (Default)
posted by [personal profile] wildeabandon at 10:55pm on 22/07/2017
I decided that since we’d be leaving quite early on Saturday morning and had guests for dinner on Friday that it would be sensible to take an extra day off work so I didn’t have to pack in a frantic hurry. Obviously I then proceeded to plan an unnecessarily ambitious meal and fill the day from start to finish with Events, so had to pack in a rush on Thursday night instead… I got up fairly early and went for a run which finished at church. Somewhat to my surprise I found that the gates were locked, but I wasn’t foiled and managed to scale the wall and get in anyway (once past the wall the rest of the break-in was facilitated by the clever trick of having keys). I dropped off the cheques I needed signatures on, and spent a while trying to get the ancient (running Vista!) laptop working, as I’m hoping to get the people who count the collection to enter the figures directly into a spreadsheet rather than writing them down, to save me some data entry. I didn’t quite manage to get it working, but I did get a bit of organ practice inbetween interminably slow reboots…

I took the bus rather than running home, and picked up a last couple of missing ingredients, then began prepping the beetroot three ways (boiled and diced, roasted with balsamic vinegar, and finely sliced then deep fried, then baked) for the starter, and the venison meatballs for the main course. Naturally that took a little longer than expected, and I was a few minutes late out the door to head to [personal profile] charlie’s for lunch. They’d gotten out of hospital a couple of days ago, and were still a little fragile, but seemed massively happier than the last couple of times I’ve seen them, which was very pleasing to see.

I then had another session with the physio I saw a couple of weeks ago. After the first session I was absolutely amazed by how much difference he made to my back - I’d had a couple of days completely tension-free for the first time in months, and even after it started to creep back in, it was definitely less intrusive than it has been. This time he suggested trying acupuncture, which I’m quite sceptical of, but given his previous results I figured I’d give it a go. I’m still feeling kind of sceptical afterwards, but I’ll give it another couple of days to see how it feels then, and probably ask him to stick with the kinds of treatment he did from my first session in future.

Then home again, and more cooking until Stephani (winodw) and her newish partner Matthew arrived. I started with a failure, as she asked for a repeat of a cocktail I’d made her once before, but although we had all the relevant booze we were lacking apple juice. Oops. Still, we managed to find them something to drink, and I was pretty pleased with how the food came out. The new fella was quiet but charming, and they were adorkably coupley, which brought back fond memories of what Ramesh & I were like when we first got back together.
kaberett: Clyde the tortoise from Elementary, crawling across a map, with a red tape cross on his back. (elementary-emergency-clyde)
I have been meaning to write this up for a while and have just had cause to do so elsenet; ergo, have a copy of Alex's Algorithm For Choosing A New GP. It has served me pretty well thus far.

Comments and additions welcome, as ever. :-)

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